published by Del Mar Community Alliance. Inc.
Inside the September 2019 Print Issue

Click on cover for SEPTEMBER print issue in pdf format.


Pulling Teeth
Ann Gardner


COMMENTARY
Sedona Short Woes

Bud Emerson


Letter to the Editor:
Trench Troubles

Greg Beckham

Serious Selection
Ellie Haviland


ROVING TEEN REPORTER
Up in Smoke

Dhathry Doppalapudi



Bullets Bounce Back
Rose Ann Sharp


Budget Facts: Parking Enforcement Pays
Tom McGreal


Resort Reduction
Ann Gardner


Off the Bluffs
Dwight Worden


Letter to the Editor:
Managed Retrea
t
Jerry Jacobs


NUKES
Déjà Vu All Over Again

Don Mosier


Bad Bluffs
Julie Maxey-Allison


Big Time Baseball
Tom Sohn


Whither Winston:
Shores Park Puzzle

Ann Gardner


No Plastic Please
Valerie Dufort-Roy


Where to Live
Ann Gardner


Bully’s, Adios
Jeff Barnouw


Cut Your Watts
Dolores Davies Jamison


Farmers Market:
Farmer Couple

Leslie Robson


Device Dos and Don’ts
Sudeepto Roy


Books are Back
Julie Maxey-Allison


eCeltic Books & Treasures
Jeff Barnouw


Reptile Tales
Julie Maxey-Allison


Burial Time
Kristen Crane


Young Virtuosos
Jeff Barnouw


Leafy Greens
Dolores Davies Jamison


DMF: May 2019
Bill Morris
Jenny Galan
Sandra Hoyle


DMCC: May 2019
Ashley Simpkins


Extra copies of the Sandpiper are available at: the Del Mar Community Building on 9th Street; the Library; the Powerhouse; the Farmers’ Market; the Carmel Valley Library;the Solana Beach Library and the Solana Beach Community Center.


Calendars

DM Calendar

DMCC Calendar

DMF Calendar

DM Library Calendar

DM Village Association

Public Meetings

City Council

Design Review Board

Planning Commission

 
Click to enlarge.

September

Update 08/28/19
 
Pulling Teeth
Ann Gardner
 

There seems to be a whole lot of moaning and groaning going on over the construction of our new Downtown Streetscape. We bet when all is said and done we are going to love the results and wonder why we had been so impatient. In the meantime we decided to shine some light on the issue now, sharing the complaints we have heard and asking City Manager Scott Huth how come, for instance, construction is taking so long; why are we doing this in the middle of summer when there are many more visitors coming to Del Mar? Or “what’s the big deal anyway; looks like it is just a bunch of new curbs and some cross walks.

Scott feels your pain and is doing his share of moaning and groaning. Based on his experience as City Manager in Coronado during that city’s Streetscape project and, as a resident of La Mesa during that city’s project, he declares “I hate the process but love the outcome.” He explains that Streetscape projects are among the most complex, difficult and worst projects to manage. “There are so many construction variables while at the same time keeping the traffic moving and the businesses open.” The construction variables include weather, unforeseen corroded infrastructure (“the roadway is 40 to 50 years old riddled with challenges that we couldn’t not fix”), working with private property owners and businesses making changes “in the field” that were simply the “better thing to do.” And given the road is expected to last for the next 50-100 years.

more

Support Us


Join our
email list

Your email address here


Contact us
here

Search
here


Readers' page
here


 
 
September Print Issue
COMMENTARY
Sedona Short Woes
Bud Emerson

What can Del Mar learn from a recent story about the small town of Sedona believing short term rentals “killed our city”? Investors are turning houses into short term rental businesses; “instead of a community it is now an investment.” Prices are going up, squeezing out young families, forcing new teachers to resign, unable to find housing. Their new superintendent bid on four houses, each time outbid by short term rental investors. Only 29 houses are long term rentals, while short term rentals are now more than 20% of their housing inventory and growing rapidly. Neighborhoods are being overwhelmed by “party-time” tourist behavior. Citizens are up in arms.

more

 
September Print Issue
ROVING TEEN REPORTER
Up in Smoke
Dhathry Doppalapudi
In early August, the story of college freshman Chance Ammirata’s lung collapsing as a result of vaping swept over social media. The 18-year-old Florida International University student had been vaping regularly for a year and a half, which led to a hole and a smattering of black spots on the inside of his lung. After undergoing surgery to reinflate his lung, he partnered with the Parents Against Vaping and E-Cigarettes and started a social media campaign to put “an end to vaping.”

Hearing this story, Brad, a senior at Torrey Pines High School, took it upon himself to quit his own nicotine addiction. “I saw a post [about Chance] on Instagram and it really scared me and I just threw my Juul away in the trash,” he said. “I had tried to quit or take breaks from nicotine in the past and I was never really able to do it, but this was it for me and a few other friends who also vaped.”

more

 
September Print Issue
Bullets Bounce Back
Rose Ann Sharp

On September 28-29, a court-ordered Del Mar gun show will be held at the Fairgrounds. On Saturday, September 28, between 10am and noon, NeverAgainCA will lead a community protest against gun shows on state-owned property and the harm they cause. The protest will be under the billboard at the southwest corner of Via de la Valle and Jimmie Durante; there is plenty of parking available along Via de la Valle for anyone wishing to join us.

Intuitively Del Mar residents knew that the gun show was a danger to their community. Research and investigative reporting have established that What Happens at One Gun Show Does not Stay at that Gun Show. Dr. Garen Wintemute, founding director of the Violence Prevention Research project at UC Davis, in his book “Inside Gun Shows” writes: “Gun sellers at Crossroads shows follow the shows from state to state, which can also facilitate criminal activity in California. At a Crossroads show (in Del Mar), I listened as a customer sought to buy multiple assault-type weapons, which would have been illegal on several grounds. The seller declined, but said that he would make the sale a few weeks later at a Crossroads show in Phoenix.” Ten years later, Del Mar resident Sheila Sharpe heard almost the exact same conversation when she toured the Del Mar gun show in May 2018.

more

 
September Print Issue
Big Time Baseball
Tom Sohn
Former Del Mar Little Leaguer and resident Garrett Stubbs received a pretty good and well-earned 26th birthday present this past May: Stubbs received his call-up from the AAA (the highest level in the minor league) Round Rock Express. With his family in attendance, Stubbs made his Major League debut on May 28 with the Houston Astros, starting as catcher against the Chicago Cubs. Stubbs doubled to left in his first at-bat during the second inning and came through with an RBI single in the fourth to tie the game. The Astros beat the Cubs 9-6 with Stubbs going 2-4 at the plate.

Overall, it was a great start for the two-time All-CIF selection from Torrey Pines. Stubbs grew up in Del Mar, graduated from Torrey Pines in 2011 and graduated from USC in 2015 where he won the Johnny Bench Award — a prize annually bestowed upon the nation’s best collegiate catcher. After graduation, the Houston Astros selected Stubbs in the eighth round of the 2015 MLB Draft. Ironically, Stubbs’s first team for the Del Mar Little League was the Astros.

more

 
September Print Issue
Books are Back
Julie Maxey-Allison
Dear Reader: Yes! Books are back in Del Mar!

An actual book store for children, Sandcastle Tales, welcomes families into the new space set up with books on nature, animals, art, the environment and the ocean as well as some classics that adults will remember. Owner Alex Rhett, whose background is international relations, traveling, and teaching, encourages reading, telling children: “when you read you get to go places and discover new worlds…hear others’ thoughts and learn of their experiences.” In addition to books and story times, Alex added activities—sand art, crafts, and snacks.

Sandcastle Tales. 1414 Camino del Mar. Monday-Saturday: 10:30 am-5:00 pm. Sunday: 1:00 pm-5:00 pm.

more

 
September Print Issue
Young Virtuosos
Jeff Barnouw
There is a certain bravado in presenting an event as the “first annual …,” but when Del Mar native Jordan Kuspa announced his “vision to create a world-class destination for composers to share new music with the public and with each other,” he was serious. And it turned out glorious.

From August 5-10, five young composers in their early thirties, originally from Gran Canaria, West Virginia, Iran, Korea, and Nebraska, came together in Del Mar, invited by our own contemporary composer Jordan Kuspa, to take part in a symposium: a series of discussions and public forums, open rehearsals, and a concluding concert. The Parish Hall of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church provided an attractive venue through the week.

In the open rehearsals we could witness the Hausmann Quartet of SDSU working to gain mastery of an astonishing array of music, new to them and new to everyone, some of it innovative and challenging.

more

 
September Print Issue
Farmers Market:
Farmer Couple
Leslie Robson
Norma and Ruben Lopez love what they do. With sustainability as their mantra and a great appreciation for what well cared for soil can do for produce, the couple have been farming on 15 leased acres in Valley Center for four years. Behneman Farm, originally 100 acres, was owned by Norma’s side of the family since 1971. Norma worked with her aunt at farmer’s markets for years prior to beginning her own farm with her husband.

The young couple began farming by working the land with a trial-and-error outlook, visiting other farms and letting successes and failures inform their decisions about what they grow. They farm by hand, trying to not disturb the soil too much, tilling with forks, weeding by hand, feeding the soil with homemade year-old compost. They do not use a tractor, which can compact the soil, and use drip irrigation from their well. Their labor is shared. Ruben runs the greenhouse, where veggies are started, and he does the pruning and watering. Norma is in charge of planting, weeding and harvesting. An uncle helps out when there is a need and a friend helps with market sales.“ We feed the soil, so it can feed the plants,” explained Norma.

more

 
Search our website
 
 


 
       

website by virginia lawrence
© 2007-2019 Del Mar Community Alliance, Inc.  All rights reserved.

a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tru Cou S

 

 

ackli